English Way

5 Stages | 125 km

The English Way is one of the least known routes of the Camino de Santiago. Perfect for all those who are looking for a Camino of solitude and disconnection. A trip in which you will be able to reach Santiago de Compostela in only one week and in which you will know two different parts of Galicia, the marine life of the estuaries and the tranquility of the small villages of the interior of Galicia.

Our trips of the English Way of Santiago

Information on the English Way

The English Way

The English Way is an adventure that has little to do with other Jacobean routes such as the French or Portuguese. Although more and more pilgrims are encouraged by this route, the truth is that it is still a lonely road, perfect if you are looking for a few days of tranquility and restlessness.

A simple route that, although it has some considerable unevenness, can be done comfortably if you take it easy. The 120 km that separate Ferrol from Santiago de Compostela make it the perfect itinerary if you are looking to do a complete route of the Camino de Santiago in a few days.

This path has two very different parts. During the first stretch the sea will accompany you giving you spectacular landscapes of estuary, marshes, ports, beaches and large towns of historical, monumental and industrial importance. But as we move away from the sea, the landscape will become more and more rural, the large towns give way to solitary villages, forests and lonely paths so typical of inland Galicia.

The English Way

Where to start the English Route?

The traditional starting point of the English itinerary is located in the city of Ferrol, from where there is a distance of 120 kilometers to Santiago de Compostela. This route is perfect for those pilgrims who wish to do a complete route of the Camino de Santiago in just one week.

The port of A Coruña also welcomed thousands of pilgrims arriving by sea during the Middle Ages, from where they undertook the 72 km that separate the city from Santiago de Compostela. However, over time, the use of this route was increasingly lost. The main reason is that the distance is not enough to obtain the Compostela certificate; let’s remember that pilgrims on foot need to have travelled at least 100 kilometres.